CLASE POLYCHAETA PDF

Although most are 5 to 10 cm long, some are less than 1 mm, and others may be as long as 3 m. Some are brightly colored in reds and greens; others are dull or iridescent. Figure Tube-dwelling sedentary polychaetes. A, One of the featherduster worms called a Christmas-tree worm , Spirobranchus giganteus, has a double crown of radioles and lives in a calcareous tube.

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Common, projecting from crevices in rocks; also on wharf pilings and marina floats. In smaller individuals, end of tube flattens and curls up when worm withdraws. Common; in sandy substrate adjacent to kelp forests in Monterey region, usually solitary, but associated with beds of Diopatra ornata. Range: Alaska to central California Synonyms: Similar species: Eudistylia polymorpha is very similar, but usually occurs in rocky areas and its branchial plume is uniform orange, tan, or maroon.

Common, often occurring in clusters in crevices on rocks or in sandy patches between rocks in kelp forests; branchial plume usually flush with substratum.

Range: Bering Sea to California Synonyms: Similar species: other sabellids secrete tubes rather than gelatinous masses to live in. Locally abundant; in sand near rocky outcrops usually in between large tubes of Diopatra ornata. Range: central to southern California Synonyms: Similar species: Myxicola infundibulum is larger, usually with dull olive or green branchial plume rather than rose. Bispira sp. Phylum Annelida, Class Polychaeta, Order Sabellida, Family Sabellidae Tube worm to 5 cm long; branchial plume 15 mm across, pale purple to maroon speckled with dark photosensitive eyespots.

Common, but inconspicuous; in crevices on rocks in kelp forest depths. Image: Lagenicella rt. Worm to 5 cm. Moderately common, in rocky crevices and in sandy areas adjacent to rocky outcrops mixed with Diopatra ornata.

Megaloma splendida is similar, but has radioles tipped with black eye spots rather than just 2.

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Class Polychaeta (Poly, many + chaise, hair)

Common, projecting from crevices in rocks; also on wharf pilings and marina floats. In smaller individuals, end of tube flattens and curls up when worm withdraws. Common; in sandy substrate adjacent to kelp forests in Monterey region, usually solitary, but associated with beds of Diopatra ornata. Range: Alaska to central California Synonyms: Similar species: Eudistylia polymorpha is very similar, but usually occurs in rocky areas and its branchial plume is uniform orange, tan, or maroon. Common, often occurring in clusters in crevices on rocks or in sandy patches between rocks in kelp forests; branchial plume usually flush with substratum. Range: Bering Sea to California Synonyms: Similar species: other sabellids secrete tubes rather than gelatinous masses to live in. Locally abundant; in sand near rocky outcrops usually in between large tubes of Diopatra ornata.

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Class Polychaeta

They can sometimes be brightly coloured, and may be iridescent or even luminescent. Bundles of bristles, called chaetae , project from the parapodia. The most generalised polychaetes are those that crawl along the bottom, but others have adapted to many different ecological niches , including burrowing, swimming, pelagic life, tube-dwelling or boring, commensalism , and parasitism , requiring various modifications to their body structures. The head, or prostomium , is relatively well developed, compared with other annelids. The head normally includes two to four pair of eyes, although some species are blind. These are typically fairly simple structures, capable of distinguishing only light and dark, although some species have large eyes with lenses that may be capable of more sophisticated vision.

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Polychaete

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